Top 5 Tuesday: Authors from U to Z

Top 5 Tuesday is hosted by Shanah @ The Bionic Book Worm. For the month of March, each week will represent five letters of the alphabet, and for today, we have what remains: from U to Z (which makes six prompts, but basically the hardest ones). I will try to share a favourite author for each one of them, so without further ado, here comes the list!


 

The letter U:

I cannot, for the life of me, think of anyone here. We are off to a great start.

The letter V: Suzanne Van Rooyen with Scardust

As I couldn’t think of anything else, we shall go with this one for the letter V. Scardust is a new adult sci-fi set in 2037 (which is actually not that far away now that I think of it, the book was published in 2016 and oh wow, has it already been four years?) around a project that is supposed to send people into space. Two boys meet and it feels like that will change their fate forever…

The letter W: Kasie West with P.S. I Like You

This is the book I discovered Kasie West with. It seemed like nothing much at first, but it had great romance tropes and I couldn’t resist. I have also read Love, Life and the List and really enjoyed it, and plan on reading more of her books. Maybe not all of them because she has written A LOT. But definitely some of them, because they’re great! Did I pick Kasie West because I met her last year and she complemented my hair? Maybe so. She was super sweet ❤

Also beloved: Jesmyn Ward with Sing, Unburied, Sing and Alice Walker with The Color Purple, obviously. I did not expect W to have so many good books.

The letter X:

I am sure there are a lot of authors whose last name starts with an X. I’m just not sure I have read any of them.

The letter Y: David Yoon with Frankly in Love

For this one I have chosen one of my latest reads! By now I’m pretty sure I won’t make a full review of it but it’s still nice to talk about it, because I enjoy it very much. The book follows the life of Frank, who is a senior in high school, as he falls in love, and has to decide what his future will hold. His parents are Korean immigrants who of course, have their expectations for him. The book was both beautiful and moving, and also extremely realistic, and I would definitely recommend it!

Also beloved: Nicola Yoon with The Sun is Also a Star and Jane Yolen with Finding Baba Yaga.

The letter Z: Markus Zusak with The Book Thief

How could I not pick this book. Like many other people, it’s one of my favourites. It’s absolutely beautiful, and heartbreaking, and all of the pain is worth it. It’s a historical fiction set in Germany during WWII. We follow a couple who adopted the daughter of a communist, and are hiding a Jewish man in their basement. Already with that premise, you have to know that you’re going to cry. And it will be worth it. And of course, I really want to check out Bridge of Clay.


That’s it for today! I had a lot of fun with the prompts this month, and I can’t wait to see what we will do in April!

Down the TBR Hole #5

Every time I click on the “Want to Read” button on Goodreads I feel a little bit guiltier these days because I can’t help but be reminded of the fact that my TBR is going to CRUSH me. So I figured it might be time to make another one of those. And yes, I made one at the beginning of the month, but paradoxically, it both seems like I am on a roll, and that it happened FOREVER ago. So here we go.

Down the TBR Hole was created by Lia, formerly @ Lost in a Story. If you want to check out my previous post, here’s the link. And as for the rules, they are as follows:

  • Go to your Goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date Added.
  • Take the first 5 to 10 books (I picked 10)
  • Read the synopsis of the book
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?

As I start this post, my TBR contains 748 books, which is 20 less than at the beginning of my last post! I guess that counts as progress. It’s still a lot, obviously, but I believe in myself. We can do this.

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1. The Fill-in Boyfriend by Kasie West

This one is bound to be a cute YA romance, and I really liked other books by Kasie West so I’m going to trust her once more. In addition to that it has come to my attention recently that this book is available on Scribd, so I might even read it in April, who knows! IT STAYS.

2. The Darkest Part of the Forest by Holly Black

Now that I have read an loved The Cruel Prince and the rest of the Folk of the Air trilogy, I have to admit that I am curious about the rest of Holly Black’s books. I also loved the Chronicles of Spiderwick as a kid, and I really want to check out more of her magical universes. So yes, I might actually read that one. IT STAYS.

3. One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

This list is so random, but anyway. I know this book is a classic, but when I look at the blurb, it doesn’t really appeal to me. So you know what that means: IT GOES.

4. The Darkest Minds by Alexandra Bracken

While I absolutely LOVED the Passenger duology, the concept of The Darkest Minds doesn’t really appeal to me anymore. I guess I have outgrown my obsession with dystopia, and can now say for sure that I will not read this book. IT GOES.

5. The Evolution of Mara Dyer by Michelle Hodkin

Okay so I actually want to read that one. I own the book as a beautiful hardcover, and it’s a sequel to a book that I liked. I’m actually considering picking it up during the confinement, if I’m not drowned in other universes. IT STAYS. Gladly. (The reason why I didn’t pick it up sooner is fairly stupid: as soon as I finished book one, I wanted to order it but I actually messed up and ordered the third one, and then by the time I received this one, I wasn’t in the mood anymore. Congratulations to me.)

6. An Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa Tahir

This is another YA book that used to be really popular, but I don’t hear much about it anymore. While it does look great, I am already swarmed in more recent releases, and I know deep inside that I just wanted to read it because of the hype. While I’m sure that it’s a fantastic book, I know that I’m not any closer to reading it now than I was back in 2015. So IT GOES.

7. Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee

I heard that this one was disappointed compared to To Kill a Mockingbird, so I’m goint to trust the rumors, and come to the quick conclusion that I’m not going to read this book because it’s not worth it. IT GOES.

8. The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey

I know this one is another YA dystopia. In addition to that I know that some people found it disappointing, so I’m just going to go with the flow and remove it from my TBR. IT GOES.

9. Tiger Lily by Jodi Lynn Anderson

I added this one because it’s a Peter Pan retelling, but I don’t really feel drawn to it anymore. I do love retellings, but I know I can’t read them all, and it’s okay to be a little bit picky (and realistic) sometimes. IT GOES.

10. The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making
by Catherynne M. Valente

I know I added this book to my TBR because I loved Deathless but I promptly managed to forget about it, and will do so again as soon as I am done with this article. While I might check out more of Valente’s books at some point in the future, it probably won’t be this one. IT GOES.


And I managed to keep only three books, which sounds more reasonable! After originally completing this post, I stuck to my TBR shelf on Goodreads, and decided to go on a deleting spree. Without second thoughts, I removed 100+ books, and you’ll be proud to know that said shelf now contains 506 books. That’s what I call efficiency. From 2015 we have moved to 2017/2018 and it’s really fun to watch because as I go through the list of books, I see some of them and realise that I had completely forgotten about them. But sometimes I see one and I know I added it because someone recommended it to me, or because it seemed interesting in regards of whatever paper I was writing at that point. And, the closer we get to the present, the queerer it gets so there’s that.

Thanks for reading, and I hope you have a wonderful day! Please take care of yourself, stay safe, and stay at home.

#ThePositivityWave N°3

The positivity wave is a weekly Friday update created by Meggy @ Chocolate ‘N’ Waffles and it cheers me up every time I read it on her blog so I decided to give it a go as well, because now more than ever, everybody needs a bit of positivity!

So once again, here are some of the things that made me happy in the past week 😊

🌊 I’ve spent some quality time on the phone with both my grandmas.

🌊 I made a vegan chocolate cake and it was delicious (also more cooking and baking which I always find relaxing, all the while listening to The Raven Cycle: I’m finally onto the second book!)

🌊 The weather has been nice and I got to spend some lovely time in my garden. I know it’s not something everyone can do these days, and I’m really grateful for that.

🌊 Of course, I can’t not mention the fact that I’ve read a lot of books and I’m really happy about it.

🌊 I’ve also been binge watching some kdrama which always has been a safe space for me, and what better things to do during this confinement?

🌊 I Skyped with my best friends last night and we could just pretend that things were sort of normal for one hour, it has recharged my energy!

🌊 I started learning Spanish and it’s going great so far!

Thanks for reading, stay at home, and take care of yourself 🥰

10 Books on Scribd You Should Check Out

I am trying to spend more of my free time blogging these days because 1. I have a lot of free time because work is cancelled and 2. It’s more productive than watching Netflix (something else I have been doing a lot!) I also learnt than in our time of confinement, Scribd had decided to make its free trial period last for a month rather than a week (if I am correct) and proceeded to make an account immediately. While browsing, I decided to make this post.

Of course, not ALL the books in the world are available on this app. But it does have some great ebooks, and some great audiobooks as well, if it’s something that you like. I am currently listening to The Dream Thieves by Maggie Stiefvater. And I have decided to share 10 amazing books that you can find on Scribd if you make an account!

(And no, this post is not sponsored or anything, it’s just a product of my boredom.)

Starfish by Akemi Dawn Bowman

It seems I have another great opportunity to rave about how much I loved this book, so I’m not going to miss it. Starfish is the story of a girl, Kiko, who is finishing her Senior year of high school and trying to figure out what to do with her future. She deals on the daily with anxiety, and deeply buried PTSD as well as micro-agressions from her mother. To me, this book was both beautiful and relatable. It shows a journey of getting better, but also describes the spiralling down process extremely well. It’s a book I will always cherish, and recommend.

The Weight of Our Sky by Hanna Alkaf

Probably my favourite release of 2019! The more I think about it, the more I realise that’s the case. Set in Kuala Lumpur during the riots of 1969, we follow the story of Melati, a teenager who got separated from her mother during the race riots, and is trying her to reunite with her while dealing with her OCD. It’s a wonderful story about people and how we need to be here for one another, set with a background of historical events that we should talk about more.

Dear Martin by Nic Stone

Another book that blew my mind. This one was published in 2017, and Nic Stone is currently working on a sequel which I totally didn’t see coming, but am now super hyped about. Through the story, we follow Justyce, who is a senior in high school, as he tries to unveil the truth surrounding his brother’s death, after he was shot by a police officer. This book is excellent, and eye-opening.

The Chaos of Longing by K.Y. Robinson

I thought I would also include one poetry recommendation, because they seem to have a large selection as well! (At least when it comes to the poetry that I like and enjoy? I haven’t seen it all obviously.) I read The Chaos of Longing a few years ago and I really liked it because it felt both beautiful and relatable. It’s nothing extravagant, a poetry that is a bit similar to Rupi Kaur, and Amanda Lovelace. But every author has their personal experience, so of course it’s also different. Anyway, if it’s something you enjoy, then I would definitely recommend this one.

And when it comes to poetry, I am currently reading Please Don’t Go Before I Get Better by Madisen Kuhn!

Saints and Misfits by S.K. Ali

This book was excellent, but it also has some trigger warnings when it comes to sexual assault, microagression ans islamophobia. That being said, it was beautifully crafted, and also, I believe, very important. It’s the story of Janna, a Muslim teenager girl who is growing up in a world where she has to grapple with her identity. There are people who don’t understand her for her faith, and her community who doesn’t understand why she hangs out with people who are not Muslim so much. And I thought that overall, the book was really well executed. I read it too long ago to voice my thoughts more precisely, to be fairly honest. But I do know that I loved this book. (And Love from A to Z is waiting somewhere on a book pile in my room!)

Random thought that occured to me: If you liked this book, and don’t know what to do with your time during quarantine, go watch SKAM.

Tash Hearts Tolstoy by Kathryn Ormsbee

My new favourite book! It has everything when it comes to my favourite tropes. Boy next door, friends to lovers, instant fame, mutual pining… (And miscommunication because how else is a good book supposed to work out!) A YouTube channel that has created a modern retelling of Anna Karenina! So many things that I like in the same place. It even has excellent asexual rep, and I’m desperate for more. Do yourself a favour and go read this book.

Isla and the Happily Ever After by Stephanie Perkins

Okay, I have to admit that the biggest reason Isla and the Happily Ever After is featured on this list is because I actually read it on Scribd, so I somehow had to repay to the favour by including it on the list (sorry, that’s how my brain works.) But also it’s my favourite in this trilogy, because Isla was the most relatable character out of them all. AND it’s also a book which includes a lot of traveling which is GREAT considering we are not allowed to go out, and travel is pretty much all I can think about these days!

The 100 by Kass Morgan

TV show set aside, I thought The 100 was a nice YA book. We have a post-apocalyptic setting, a bunch of teens that are set free in the wild, an (at first) invisible enemy (and a situation that turns a lot more complicated), as well as some good old enemies-to-lovers relationships which, I am sorry, but is the superior romance trope. It’s an easy to read book, which is honestly quite enjoyable and left me wanting for the sequel. Also, Bellarke is canon in the books.

Love, Life and the List by Kasie West

Since I’m all about the YA romance tropes today apparently, this one has a very sweet friends-to-lovers relationship AS WELL as a relationship that has to stay a secret. It was hella cute, in true Kasie West fashion, and is the perfect cosy book to cuddle with these days!

Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saenz

And last but not least, Ari & Dante. Another book that I will never forget. It’s an excellent novel both in terms of coming-of-age, and of accepting yourself. Do yourself a favour and read this one, if you haven’t yet.

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And that’s it for today! Happy reading, and stay safe. Take one thing at a time, self-care is also important these days.

Top 5 Tuesday: Authors from P to T

Top 5 Tuesday is hosted by Shanah @ The Bionic Book Worm. For the month of March, each week will represent five letters of the alphabet, and I will share a favourite author for each one of them. This week, we do letters from P to T, and without further ado, here comes the list!


The letter P: Ashley Poston with Geekerella

I read this book a while ago, and I completely fell in love with it. It is, very obviously, a retelling of Cinderella, and I wrote a paper on that very subject, so of course I was going to read that. My obsession for retellings is never ending. And anyway, this was amazing.

The letter Q: Matthew Quick with The Silver Linings Playbook

This was one of the cases where I watched the movie, and ended up reading the book was well afterwards. Which was worth it, because the book was much better (no offence to Jennifer Lawrence). I remember that it’s one of the first audiobooks I listened to, and I didn’t want to stop.

The letter R: Amy Reed with The Nowhere Girls

This book is so important! It’s about a group of girls who get together to try and change things. To make the world a better place. To bring things to the light. To fight rape and abuse. It’s a powerful story that needed to be told. I simply couldn’t put it down, and I will never stop recommending it.

The letter S: Victoria Schwab with Shades of Magic

Or any of her books, really. I love them all (although I have not read all of them yet) and she is one of my favourite authors. Currently I am waiting for the next installment in her Cassidy Blake middle grade series, and I’m also really curious about her Addie Larue project!

The letter T: Laini Taylor with Daughter of Smoke and Bone

I read this one a few years ago, and I have yet to read the sequel because I’m really bad at finishing series but I really liked it. The universe was unique and fascinating and I completely fell in love with it. I loved the unique main character, I loved the concept, I loved how her backstory was unveiled little by little, and I loved the setting of Prague. I know we are going to see more of the world in the sequels, and I really have to get it together and pick them up because I want to know!


And that’s it for today! Thank you so much for reading, and please take care of yourself in these troubled times.

#ThePositivityWave N°2

The positivity wave is a weekly Friday update created by Meggy @ Chocolate ‘N’ Waffles and it cheers me up every time I read it on her blog so I decided to give it a go as well, because now more than ever, everybody needs a bit of positivity! 😊

I obviously inteded at first to do it every week, but oh well that didn’t happen. But Meggy is right, now would be a good time to share some positivity (because, you know, I’m stuck at home and my next trip is canceled). Let’s not think about the fact that I was hit by a wave of depression, and instead, think positive. Think about all the friends I’ve been chatting with in the past few days. We are keeping one another’s head out of the water.

Here’s a few things that made me happy in the past week or so!

🌊 I managed to see a lot of my friends before the confinement started, which greatly helped in recharging my batteries.

🌊 I’m getting a break from work which allows me to get more sleep, and obviously, to read more books! Yes, when I said I wanted to get a holiday, that’s obviously not what I meant. But it will do for now.

🌊 I baked a cake yesterday and it was absolutely delicious.

🌊 I started a new craft project yesterday, while listening to my audiobook for The Raven Boys, and I’m curious to see how that goes.

🌊 Yes I do not want to be all of my points book related but also I don’t care: I’m really glad because I think I will have time to pick up a bunch of books I wouldn’t have the time to read otherwise, and that is really SATISFYING.

🌊 Let’s face it, it’s not the most productive use of my time but: a few weeks ago I downloaded Tiktok because I was bored at work, and I’m really happy I made that decision because I’m having a lot of fun with this app, especially considering that I now have a lot of free time.

🌊 I have decided to take this time to pick up a new language! So no pressure, I’m learning Spanish with Duolingo. I don’t have very high ambitions, but if I could use some basic skills while traveling that would be very nice! (Did I reach that conclusion after binge watching season 3 of ELITE? Maybe so. But Spanish is a useful language anyway!)

🌊 I saw pictures of how clean the canals were in Venice, and it gave me a little bit of hope that we can actually DO SOMETHING for the planet. Like, if we make a collective effort, maybe we can clean it and not have the world turn into a dystopia? Anyway, it was a nice sight.

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And to conclude, here’s a hug for you. Please take care of yourself, this is not going to last forever!

Eve of Man: My Review

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I have finished this book earlier this month and I’m still not sure how I feel about the whole concept, so I figured I might as well write a review about it, to just talk and share my thoughts! (To be fairly honest, I was planning on making this article right away, but it just didn’t happen, so here we go.)

Title: Eve of Man
Authors: Giovanna and Tom Fletcher
Genre: YA, Sci-Fi/Dystopia
Release: 2019
My rating: ⭐⭐⭐

Warning: May contain spoilers!

The story:

Basically, Eve of Man is a YA dystopia about a girl called Eve, who is the first girl to be born in 50 years. Raised apart from everyone else (among women who at this point of the story are all about 70) she is the only hope that the human race has to survive. She feels like she doesn’t have much of a choice. Until she meets Bram by accident. Until things are unveiled, and she realises… Is humanity worth saving after all? I guess that’s a question for the sequel…

My thoughts:

Before I delve any further into my ramble, I just wanted to point out that I read this book mainly because I got an ARC upon the French release (which was beginning of February) and I have to admit it got me really curious. And in addition to that, it’s also a fairly recent release and I like reading books that were released recently because it somehow makes me feel like I have it together so there’s that… ANYWAY.

While I did like the concept, I feel like I still had too many questions to fully understand it. I know, I know, I could have just accepted the whole thing — and I did. Okay, she was the first girl to be born in 50 years. But how is she supposed to repopulate the Earth ALL BY HERSELF? She can’t be the only mother, we all know that is not going to work. That never really made sense to me. Although some things were explained LATE in the book in terms of scientific experiments (which were to be expected although a sheltered Eve would not have seen it coming) I was still relatively skeptic.

A high fantasy with magical creatures? Yes of course, I can picture that. A world where a girl hasn’t been born for 50 years? Sorry, I don’t buy it. I guess that’s my bad. I feel like I was catapulted into this universe without enough world building. The information arrived too late into the book. (Or maybe I have become too picky when it comes to YA dystopia…)

I don’t know, this book left me frustrated, and I just wanted to put it out there. So here goes. Have you read Eve of Man as well? If you have, please feel free to share your thoughts with me, I would love to discuss it! Will I pick up the sequel? Probably at some point, because I have to admit that I am still really curious as to what will happen next. I feel like maybe the first book was too slow, although the concept definitely has potential!

I am also very curious to see how they will develop the concept of Eve being attracted to Bram fully knowing that he is Holly, and also being attracted to Holly when she knows that he is a part of her? I don’t know, that was weird and at the same time gave me strong bisexual vibes (but maybe I’m the only one) which is ironic considering that Eve is, after all, the last woman on Earth. But I’m rambling, and I shall see what happens in the future when the next book is released!

Overall, I was not entirely sold on this book, but I’m still curious as to what will happen next. There you have it.

Top 5 Tuesday: Authors from K to O

Top 5 Tuesday is hosted by Shanah @ The Bionic Book Worm. For the month of March, each week will represent five letters of the alphabet, and I will share a favourite author for each one of them, so without further ado, here comes the list!


The letter K: Rupi Kaur with Milk and Honey

I’ve thought this through, and I will always have a soft spot for this poetry book, so its spot on this list is well deserved ♥

The letter L: Olivia Laing with The Lonely City

I have read The Lonely City a few days ago, and I absolutely fell in love with this book. It’s a series of short essays about artists who lived in New York City. It’s both super interesting and well written, and a book I would definitely recommend. I have also met Olivia Laing at a reading for her book Crudo which was also amazing!

The letter M: Madeline Miller with Circe

It was a tough choice for this one, as expected, and right behind Madeline Miller was Marissa Meyer with The Lunar Chronicles obviously but I loved Circe so much, it’s a book that left a deep impact on me in terms of feminism, and what literary fiction can be. Also taught me that a retelling can be anything we want and give a voice to people who were mistreated in the original story. This book 👏 was 👏 amazing 👏 and I love it so much. The Song of Achilles was brilliant was well by the way. And I swear I didn’t do this on purpose, but I also met Madeline Miller at a reading. And Marissa Meyer at a signing? Okay I will stop now.

The letter N: Patrick Ness with More Than This

It’s actually the only Patrick Ness bool I read but I loved it so much! It’s a unique post-death/dystopian universe, with strong and endearing characters. I came into the book not really knowing what to expect and I simply fell in love with it.

The letter O: Lauren Oliver with Before I Fall

This one will probably end up becoming the only Lauren Oliver book I ever read but it’s okay because I loved it so much (and as much as I love Zoey Deutsch, the movie didn’t do it justice). It gave me thrills and butterflies in my stomach and I will never forget it — it’s already been 8 years after all. So yes, it unapologetically takes this spot! 💃


Thank you so much for reading until now! Feel free to recommend more books in the comments, matching the prompt or not. As I am quarantined for who knows how long, I have plenty of time to read!

Top 5 Tuesday: Authors from F to J

Okay, so yes I am doing this on a Wednesday, but it’s just because I haven’t sorted my schedule properly. Top 5 Tuesday is hosted by Shanah @ The Bionic Book Worm. For the month of March, each week will represent five letters of the alphabet, and I will share a favourite author for each one of them!


The letter F: Carrie Fisher with Wishful Drinking

It’s been a while since I last talked about how much I love Carrie Fisher, and now seemed like the perfect opportunity to do just that. I just really love how she captured mental illness in her books, and she’s just so amazing in general!

The letter G: Elizabeth Gilbert with Eat, Pray, Love

Of course my immediate response to this letter was John Green, but although Turtles All The Way Down was brilliant and relatable I decided to go with a choice that was a little 1. less obvious and 2. less mentioned on my blog. After all, I already talked about Looking for Alaska a few posts ago. But anyway. Eat, Pray, Love was (along with One Day) one of the first books I actually purchased for myself and read in English, and it left a deep impact on me. It’s extremely inspiring, probably partly responsible for my love of travelling, and overall makes me want to be a better person. So yes, definitely a good book. And now I want to pick up the rest if Elizabeth Gilbert’s work.

The letter H: Khaled Hosseini with The Kite Runner

I was tempted to choose Jenny Han for a moment but if there were only few books that I’d be able to take with me to, say, a deserted island, The Kite Runner would be more likely to make it to the list (although let’s face it, it would be smarter to take a book I haven’t read yet!) In this book, Khaled Hosseini takes us from Kaboul to the US, in a stunning story about friendship and the choices you make while growing up. I did cry a lot but was it worth it? Absolutely.

The letter I: Henrik Ibsen with A Doll’s House

If you search into Google “author whose last name starts with an I” it will come up with a list of books on Goodreads, and the top two authors are Kazuo Ishiguro and Henrik Ibsen. As this is the same answer I came up with after a quick search on my blog, I decided to look no further. To be fairly honest, the only Ishiguro book I have read is a series of short stories called Nocturnes which didn’t leave that big an impression on me, UNLIKE A DOLL’S HOUSE which is a brilliant, wonderful feminist play from 1879. It is so empowering to watch Nora become a strong, independent woman and I simply cannot get enough.

[After just finishing Yellow Crocus by Laila Ibrahim I realised that I could have, in fact, used it in this very position, but I guess I will talk about it in another post later!]

The letter J: Erika Johansen with The Queen of the Tearling

Kudos to this trilogy for being one I have actually finished, so that’s already a good sign. Those books were absolutely brilliant. They had such a unique, almost eerie atmosphere, and it was an incredible reading experience. It’s a bit of a mix between fantasy and science fiction because it’s supposedly set at some point in the future, but some of the powers evoked scream fantasy to me. And for some reason those books left a deep a big impact on me, so here we go!


And that’s it for today! Thank you so much for reading, and have a wonderful day!

Top 5 Tuesday: Authors from A to E

Okay, so yes I am doing this on a Wednesday, but it’s just because I haven’t sorted my schedule properly. Top 5 Tuesday is hosted by Shanah @ The Bionic Book Worm. For the month of March, each week will represent five letters of the alphabet, and I will share a favourite author for each one of them! I gotta say, I was a bit surprised at first, but I’m excited!


The Letter A: Hanna Alkaf with The Weight of our Sky

I’m kicking off the list with some of my favourite reads of last year, and I wouldn’t have it any other way. The Weight of our Sky takes place in Kuala Lumpur, during the 1969 riots. It follows a teenage girl with OCD who is looking for her mother throughout the city, and it’s an INCREDIBLE story which also happens to be Hanna Alkaf’s first book: kudos for that. And if you haven’t read it, what are you waiting for?

The Letter B: Akemi Dawn Bowman with Starfish

I completely fell in love with this book. It tells the story of Kiko, a Japanese-American teenage girl who is trying to figure out what she wants to do with her life. She suffers from PTSD, and a mother who either ignores her or bullies her. It’s a book both heartbreaking and absolutely stunning. It’s incredible to watch Kiko get her life in her own hands through one summer, and I can only recommend you read the book. I haven’t yet read anything else by Akemi Dawn Bowman, but I will for sure.

The Letter C: Roshani Chokshi with The Gilded Wolves

This book is a heist with a crew of outcasts, and I don’t need much more to get me curious, but more than this, it is set in Paris during the 1889 International Exhibition which is about the best setting you can have for a book. It has bits of fantasy, and adventure, and what can I say, I just loved it so much. I also really can’t get enough of Roshani Chokshi’s Aru Shah series, and cannot wait for the sequel in both cases. Keep the good stuff coming, because I am here for it!

The Letter D: Anthony Doerr with All the Light we cannot see

In case you haven’t heard of it (which to be fair, I remember it was all over the place a few years ago, but maybe that’s not the case anymore) this book is a BRILLIANT historical fiction that takes place in between France and Germany during WWII. It’s a very beautiful book, which I will never forget, and would 100% recommend to EVERYONE.

The Letter E

One of my favourite French authors is called Annie Ernaux. She writes non fiction about her life, and society. Her book The Years was translated into English not too long a go, and I would most definitely recommend it! It picks up when the author was born in 1940, and follows French history until today. It’s extremely well done, and conveys a feeling of being both part of history, and watching it for afar, which somehow really resonated with me. If you’re looking to read more French books, then I would definitely recommend it!


And that’s it for today, thank you so much for reading ♥