Diversity Spotlight Thursday #19

Hi readers! The Diversity Spotlight Thursday is a weekly meme which was created by Aimal on her blog Bookshelves and Paperbacks and you are welcome to participate as well.

The rules are simple: in your diversity spotlight post, you share three books

  1. A diverse book you have read and enjoyed
  2. A diverse book that has already been released but you have not read
  3. A diverse book that has not yet been released

I haven’t done a Diversity Spotlight Thursday in forever, but I’m trying to read more and more diverse books, and I love it. I’m also trying to read all the books I mentioned previously on the TBR part of my previous spotlight posts, and it works sometimes well, sometimes not at all because I’m also a lot busy… But we’ll get there. So here we go for this week!


A Book I Have Read And Enjoyed

Beautiful Broken Things by Sara Barnard

Beautiful Broken ThingsFor this part I decided to talk about a book with a subject that is very important to me: mental illness. You can check out my review of Beautiful Broken Things here, I really think this book is important, and it talks about issues often considered taboo by our society. I liked the fact that this book shows how important and amazing friendship can be. It doesn’t contain any romance (as a main focus at least). And it felt realistic from beginning to end.

Publication: 2016
Genre: YA, Contemporary
Why is it diverse? Includes several characters with mental illness

My blurb:

Caddy and Rosie have always been best friends, and as far as Caddy was concerned, she didn’t need other friends. Of course, she had a small group of girls she would hang aroud with at school, but no one as dear as Rosie, even if they didn’t attend the same school, and Rosie was much more extroverted than her.

A new school year starts, and Caddy makes plans, to meet boys, become less of an introvert, or have a life changing event. Rosie in the meantime becomes very close to new girl Suzanne, and wants more than everything for Suzanne and Caddy to become friends as well.

Suzanne is beautiful and mysterious and Caddy wants to be more like her. She also believes that Suzanne is hiding something, but when she finds out what she realises she didn’t expect that at all. It’s something bigger than her, something that might change her life as well.


A Book On My TBR

She Wore Red Trainers by Na’ima B. Robert

She Wore Red TrainersI found out about this book on Reg @Shelatitude‘s blog, and I have to say it looks right up my alley, and I’m really curious.

Publication: 2014
Genre: YA, Contemporary, Romance
Why is it diverse? Muslim protagonist, Own Voice

Goodreads summary:

When Ali first meets Amirah, he notices everything about her—her hijab, her long eyelashes and her red trainers—in the time it takes to have one look, before lowering his gaze. And, although Ali is still coming to terms with the loss of his mother and exploring his identity as a Muslim, and although Amirah has sworn never to get married, they can’t stop thinking about each other. Can Ali and Amirah ever have a halal “happily ever after”?


A Book Releasing Soon

The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue by Mackenzi Lee

I keep hearing about this book everywhere, and what can I say, it looks fantastic!The Gentleman's Guide to Vice and Virtue

Publication: June 27th/August 10th
Genre: YA, Historical Fiction
Why is it diverse? Gay MC

Goodreads summary:

An unforgettable tale of two friends on their Grand Tour of 18th-century Europe who stumble upon a magical artifact that leads them from Paris to Venice in a dangerous manhunt, fighting pirates, highwaymen, and their feelings for each other along the way.

Henry “Monty” Montague was born and bred to be a gentleman, but he was never one to be tamed. The finest boarding schools in England and the constant disapproval of his father haven’t been able to curb any of his roguish passions—not for gambling halls, late nights spent with a bottle of spirits, or waking up in the arms of women or men.

But as Monty embarks on his grand tour of Europe, his quest for a life filled with pleasure and vice is in danger of coming to an end. Not only does his father expect him to take over the family’s estate upon his return, but Monty is also nursing an impossible crush on his best friend and traveling companion, Percy.

Still it isn’t in Monty’s nature to give up. Even with his younger sister, Felicity, in tow, he vows to make this yearlong escapade one last hedonistic hurrah and flirt with Percy from Paris to Rome. But when one of Monty’s reckless decisions turns their trip abroad into a harrowing manhunt that spans across Europe, it calls into question everything he knows, including his relationship with the boy he adores.

Witty, romantic, and intriguing at every turn, The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue is a sumptuous romp that explores the undeniably fine lines between friendship and love.


That’s it for this week, I hope you enjoyed, and feel free to share your favourite diverse reads in the comments!

I talk about some other diverse books in my latest video here if you want to watch it!

Buy me a coffee?

Have a wonderful day ♥

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #18

Hi readers! The Diversity Spotlight Thursday is a weekly meme hosted by Aimal on her blog Bookshelves and Paperbacks and since reading diverse books is important to me, I’m trying to take part every week.

The rules are simple: in your diversity spotlight post, you share three books

  1. A diverse book you have read and enjoyed
  2. A diverse book that has already been released but you have not read
  3. A diverse book that has not yet been released

I haven’t taken part in this meme for a while, but don’t give up on me yet…


A book I have read and enjoyed

Fledgling by Octavia E. Butler

FledglingPublication: 2005
Genre: Science Fiction, Fantasy
My rating: ★★★★✩
Why is it diverse? WOC main character, WOC author

Book blurb:
Fledgling
is what you call an Afrofuturist book, and it’s absolutely fascinating. It’s the story of a girl who wakes up naked in a cave, with no memory, and the sun burning her body. Soon, she finds out that though she looks 13, she feels much older. And she needs human blood to survive. Yes, that sounds pretty much like a vampire, but after various random encounters, she discovers she is actually more than the legends describe. Mixing pure fantasy and genetically modified DNA, Fledgling is an incredible read, which will make you think about racisme, equality and such. A unique and refreshing book which you should definitely read.


A book on my TBR

The Hate You Give by Angie Thomas

Released: February 2017The Hate U Give
Genre: YA, Contemporary
Why is it diverse? WOC author and protagonist, based on Black Lives Matter

Goodreads blurb:
Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend, Khalil, at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed.
Soon afterward, Khalil’s death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Starr’s best friend at school suggests he may have had it coming. When it becomes clear the police have little interest in investigating the incident, protesters take to the streets and Starr’s neighborhood becomes a war zone. What everyone wants to know is: What really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr.
But what Starr does—or does not—say could destroy her community. It could also endanger her life.

I just purchased this book last week, and I heard so many good things about it, I can’t wait to start it after I finish City of Saints & Thieves by Natalie Anderson!


A book releasing soon

Dear Martin by Nic Stone

Dear MartinRelease date: October 17th, 2017
Genre: YA, Contemporary
Why is it diverse? POC main character, WOC author

Goodreads blurb:
Justyce McAllister is top of his class, captain of the debate team, and set for the Ivy League next year—but none of that matters to the police officer who just put him in handcuffs. He is eventually released without charges (or an apology), but the incident has Justyce spooked. Despite leaving his rough neighborhood, he can’t seem to escape the scorn of his former peers or the attitude of his prep school classmates. The only exception: Sarah Jane, Justyce’s gorgeous—and white—debate partner he wishes he didn’t have a thing for.
Struggling to cope with it all, Justyce starts a journal to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. But do Dr. King’s teachings hold up in the modern world? Justyce isn’t so sure.
Then comes the day Justyce goes driving with his best friend, Manny, windows rolled down, music turned up. Way up. Much to the fury of the white off-duty cop beside them. Words fly. Shots are fired. And Justyce and Manny get caught in the crosshairs. In that media fallout, it’s Justyce who is under attack. The truth of what happened that night—some would kill to know. Justyce is dying to forget.

Another book that seems very true and moving, I can’t wait to read it and hear more about it.


And that’s it for this week’s feature! Please feel free to recommend diverse books in the comment, or share your own Diversity Spotlight Thursday!

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #17

Hi readers! The Diversity Spotlight Thursday is a weekly meme hosted by Aimal on her blog Bookshelves and Paperbacks and since reading diverse books is important to me, I’m trying to take part every week.

The rules are simple: in your diversity spotlight post, you share three books

  1. A diverse book you have read and enjoyed
  2. A diverse book that has already been released but you have not read
  3. A diverse book that has not yet been released

If you want to read more about it, you can check out the Announcement Post!


A book I have read and enjoyed

Milk and Honey by Rupi Kaur

Milk and HoneyGenre: Poetry
Released in 2014

My pick for this week is a little bit different, but I want to talk about it all the time since I read it because it was absolutely fantastic. Milk and Honey is a gorgeous poetry book written by an amazing woman, talking about love, harm, self-help, women and feminism, and I believe every one should read it. It is unique and amazing. I will definitely reread it over and over again. If you want to hear me ramble about it some more, you can check out this video. If you loved this book like I did, feel free to share the love in the comments!


A book on my TBR

Ash by Malinda Lo

Genre: YA, Fantasy, RetellingAsh
Released in 2009

Goodreads summary:
In the wake of her father’s death, Ash is left at the mercy of her cruel stepmother. Consumed with grief, her only joy comes by the light of the dying hearth fire, rereading the fairy tales her mother once told her. In her dreams, someday the fairies will steal her away, as they are said to do. When she meets the dark and dangerous fairy Sidhean, she believes that her wish may be granted.
The day that Ash meets Kaisa, the King’s Huntress, her heart begins to change. Instead of chasing fairies, Ash learns to hunt with Kaisa. Though their friendship is as delicate as a new bloom, it reawakens Ash’s capacity for love-and her desire to live. But Sidhean has already claimed Ash for his own, and she must make a choice between fairy tale dreams and true love.
Entrancing, empowering, and romantic, Ash is about the connection between life and love, and solitude and death, where transformation can come from even the deepest grief.


A book releasing soon

The Upside of Unrequited by Becky Albertalli

The Upside of UnrequitedGenre: YA, Contemporary, Romance
MC who is fat and doesn’t give a shit
LGBT+ characters
Release: April 2017

Goodreads summary:
Seventeen-year-old Molly Peskin-Suso knows all about unrequited love. No matter how many times her twin sister, Cassie, tells her to woman up, Molly can’t stomach the idea of rejection. So she’s careful. Fat girls always have to be careful.
Then a cute new girl enters Cassie’s orbit, and for the first time ever, Molly’s cynical twin is a lovesick mess. Meanwhile, Molly’s totally not dying of loneliness—except for the part where she is. Luckily, Cassie’s new girlfriend comes with a cute hipster-boy sidekick. If Molly can win him over, she’ll get her first kiss and she’ll get her twin back.
There’s only one problem: Molly’s coworker, Reid. He’s a chubby Tolkien superfan with a season pass to the Ren Faire, and there’s absolutely no way Molly could fall for him.
Right?


And that’s it for this week! Please feel free to recommend more diverse books in the comments, or give me a link to your own Diversity Spotlight Thursday! I hope you have a wonderful, wonderful day ♥

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #16

Hi readers! The Diversity Spotlight Thursday is a weekly meme hosted by Aimal on her blog Bookshelves and Paperbacks and since reading diverse books is important to me, I’m trying to take part every week.

The rules are simple: in your diversity spotlight post, you share three books

  1. A diverse book you have read and enjoyed
  2. A diverse book that has already been released but you have not read
  3. A diverse book that has not yet been released

If you want to read more about it, you can check out the Announcement Post!


A book I have read and enjoyed

The Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller

Genre: New Adult, Fantasy, Retelling

The Song of AchillesI read The Song of Achilles back in December and I promise I will review it here very soon. In the meantime, I am including it in this feature because it deserves a spot here! If you like mythology retellings and are looking for LGBTQ (M/M) reads then this is definitely something I would recommend. However, I also heard that this book had received bad critics from the LGBT+ community, so if you think the representation is not accurate, something is not right with this book, please let me know in the comments, I am always interested.

Anyway, the plot in a nutshell: The Song of Achilles, as you probably guessed from the title, follows Greek hero Achilles, before and during the Trojan war. The story is told from the eyes of his faithful companion and lover Patroclus, in a very poetic way. If you know the story of the Trojan war, this book won’t have much surprises in store for you, however, I still thought it was a very good and enjoyable retelling!


A book on my TBR

Iron Cast by Destiny Soria

Genre: YA, Fantasy, Historical Fiction

How gorgeous is that cover??

Iron CastGoodreads summary:
In 1919, Ada Navarra—the intrepid daughter of immigrants—and Corinne Wells—a spunky, devil-may-care heiress—make an unlikely pair. But at the Cast Iron nightclub in Boston, anything and everything is possible. At night, on stage together, the two best friends, whose “afflicted” blood gives them the ability to create illusions through art, weave magic under the employ of Johnny Dervish, the club’s owner and a notorious gangster. By day, Ada and Corinne use these same skills to con the city’s elite in an attempt to keep the club afloat.
When a “job” goes awry and Ada is imprisoned, she realizes they’re on the precipice of danger. Only Corinne—her partner in crime—can break her out of Haversham Asylum. But once Ada is out, they face betrayal at every turn.


A book releasing soon

We Are Okay by Nina LaCour

Genre: YA, Contemporary

We Are OkayGoodreads summary:
“You go through life thinking there’s so much you need. . . . Until you leave with only your phone, your wallet, and a picture of your mother.”
Marin hasn’t spoken to anyone from her old life since the day she left everything behind. No one knows the truth about those final weeks. Not even her best friend Mabel. But even thousands of miles away from the California coast, at college in New York, Marin still feels the pull of the life and tragedy she’s tried to outrun. Now, months later, alone in an emptied dorm for winter break, Marin waits. Mabel is coming to visit and Marin will be forced to face everything that’s been left unsaid and finally confront the loneliness that has made a home in her heart.

Release date: February 14th


And that’s all for this week’s Diversity Spotlight Thursday! I hope you enjoyed, feel to recommend me more diverse books in the comments, or give a link to your own Diversity Spotlight post as I love fnding out about new books I haven’t heard of!

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #15

Hi readers! The Diversity Spotlight Thursday is a weekly meme hosted by Aimal on her blog Bookshelves and Paperbacks and since reading diverse books is important to me, I’m trying to take part every week.

The rules are simple: in your diversity spotlight post, you share three books

  1. A diverse book you have read and enjoyed
  2. A diverse book that has already been released but you have not read
  3. A diverse book that has not yet been released

If you want to read more about it, you can check out the Announcement Post!


A book I have read and enjoyed

All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven

IMG_20150822_130939Genre: YA, Contemporary, Mental illness
My rating: ★★★★★
Released in 2015
Link to my review

I can’t believe I haven’t included this book in my Diversity Spotlight posts yet. Not only did I love it, but it is also very dear to me, because it deals with mental illness, and pictures a character who is mostly misunderstood because he stands out. And mental illness is very close to my heart, and it suffers from misunderstoods and prejudice. Honestly, I cried a lot while reading this book, but it was terribly worth it, and I definitely believe that it changed me forever.

Blurb:
“The story of a girl who learns to live from a boy who wants to die.”
Need I say more?


A book on my TBR

Cendrillon: A Carribbean Cinderella by Robert D. San Souci

Genre: Children AlbumCendrillon: A Caribbean Cinderella
Release year: 2002

I know this is only a chilrden album, but I came across it while doing some research for my thesis, and I really want to get my hands on it.

Goodreads blurb:
You may think you know this story I am going to tell you, but you have not heard it for true. I was there. So I will tell you the truth of it. Here. Now.

Goodreads


A book getting released soon

City of Saints and Thieves by Nathalie C. Anderson

Release date: January 24th
Genre: YA, Mystery/Thriller

Goodreads blurb:
City of Saints & ThievesIn the shadows of Sangui City, there lives a girl who doesn’t exist. After fleeing the Congo as refugees, Tina and her mother arrived in Kenya looking for the chance to build a new life and home. Her mother quickly found work as a maid for a prominent family, headed by Roland Greyhill, one of the city’s most respected business leaders. But Tina soon learns that the Greyhill fortune was made from a life of corruption and crime. So when her mother is found shot to death in Mr. Greyhill’s personal study, she knows exactly who’s behind it.
With revenge always on her mind, Tina spends the next four years surviving on the streets alone, working as a master thief for the Goondas, Sangui City’s local gang. It’s a job for the Goondas that finally brings Tina back to the Greyhill estate, giving her the chance for vengeance she’s been waiting for. But as soon as she steps inside the lavish home, she’s overtaken by the pain of old wounds and the pull of past friendships, setting into motion a dangerous cascade of events that could, at any moment, cost Tina her life. But finally uncovering the incredible truth about who killed her mother—and why—keeps her holding on in this fast-paced nail-biting thriller.

Goodreads


And that’s it for this week! I really want to take part in this weekly meme more often but I was really busy this past few weeks which is why I didn’t get to post as often as I wished I had… Anyway. Feel free to share and recommend diverse reads in the comments, and have a nice day!

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #14

Hi readers! The Diversity Spotlight Thursday is a weekly meme hosted by Aimal on her blog Bookshelves and Paperbacks and since reading diverse books is important to me, I’m trying to take part every week.

The rules are simple: in your diversity spotlight post, you share three books

  1. A diverse book you have read and enjoyed
  2. A diverse book that has already been released but you have not read
  3. A diverse book that has not yet been released

If you want to read more about it, you can check out the Announcement Post!


A book I have read and enjoyed

Me & Earl & the Dying Girl by Jesse Andrews

This is one of my most recent reads, and while it was not my favourite book ever, nor one of my favourite reads of 2016, I really liked the concept of the story, and found it overall quite hilarious.

Me & Earl & the Dying GirlGenre: YA, Contemporary
Release year: 2012
Why is it diverse? POC characters + leukemia
A unique coming of age story.
Full review coming soon (hopefully)

Goodreads summary:
Greg Gaines is the last master of high school espionage, able to disappear at will into any social environment. He has only one friend, Earl, and together they spend their time making movies, their own incomprehensible versions of Coppola and Herzog cult classics. Until Greg’s mother forces him to rekindle his childhood friendship with Rachel. Rachel has been diagnosed with leukemia—-cue extreme adolescent awkwardness—-but a parental mandate has been issued and must be obeyed. When Rachel stops treatment, Greg and Earl decide the thing to do is to make a film for her, which turns into the Worst Film Ever Made and becomes a turning point in each of their lives. And all at once Greg must abandon invisibility and stand in the spotlight.


A book on my TBR

A Gathering of Shadows by V.E. Schwab

A Gathering of Shadows (Shades of Magic, #2)Genre: YA, Fantasy

A Gathering of Shadows is the second book of the Shades of Magic trilogy by V.E. Schwab, following the amazing A Darker Shade of Magic which I absolutely loved (see my review here!) I keep hearing about how awesome and diverse this series is, and how it keeps getting even better with the sequel, so it’s on my list of must reads for 2017. The last book in the trilogy (A Conjuring of Lights) will also be released at some point in 2017 I think, and I’m also really excited about it. I’m not including a summary here because it might be spoilery if you haven’t read the first book in the series (and I definitely recommend you do that anyway!). If you want to check it out, here is the Goodreads page!


A book releasing soon

The Library of Fates by Aditi Khorana

The Library of FatesGenre: YA, Fantasy
Release date: July 2017

Goodreads summary:
No one is entirely certain what brings the Emperor Sikander to Shalingar. Until now, the idyllic kingdom has been immune to his many violent conquests. To keep the visit friendly, Princess Amrita has offered herself as his bride, sacrificing everything—family, her childhood love, and her freedom—to save her people. But her offer isn’t enough.
The unthinkable happens, and Amrita finds herself a fugitive, utterly alone but for an oracle named Thala, who was kept by Sikander as a slave and managed to escape amid the chaos of a palace under siege. With nothing and no one else to turn to, Amrita and Thala are forced to rely on each other. But while Amrita feels responsible for her kingdom and sets out to warn her people, the newly free Thala has no such ties. She encourages Amrita to go on a quest to find the fabled Library of All Things, where it is possible for each of them to reverse their fates. To go back to before Sikander took everything from them.
Stripped of all that she loves, caught between her rosy past and an unknown future, will Amrita be able to restore what was lost, or does another life—and another love—await?

This book looks absolutely amazing, and I’m really excited about it!


And that’s it for this week, please feel free to recommend me more diverse reads in the comments and have a nice day!

Diversity Spotlight Thursday #13

Hi readers! The Diversity Spotlight Thursday is a weekly meme hosted by Aimal on her blog Bookshelves and Paperbacks and since reading diverse books is important to me, I’m trying to take part every week.

The rules are simple: in your diversity spotlight post, you share three books

  1. A diverse book you have read and enjoyed
  2. A diverse book that has already been released but you have not read
  3. A diverse book that has not yet been released

If you want to read more about it, you can check out the Announcement Post!

I wanted to make my regular post last week, but I didn’t get to write it in the end, so here it is, one week later!


A book I have read and enjoyed

The Beginning of Everything by Robyn Schneider

Also known as Severed Heads, Broken Hearts
Genre: YA, Contemporary
Published in 2013
My rating: ★★★★★ (review)

Goodreads summary:
Golden boy Ezra Faulkner believes everyone has a tragedy waiting for them—a single encounter after which everything that really matters will happen. His particular tragedy waited until he was primed to lose it all: in one spectacular night, a reckless driver shatters Ezra’s knee, his athletic career, and his social life.
tbofNo longer a front-runner for Homecoming King, Ezra finds himself at the table of misfits, where he encounters new girl Cassidy Thorpe. Cassidy is unlike anyone Ezra’s ever met, achingly effortless, fiercely intelligent, and determined to bring Ezra along on her endless adventures.
But as Ezra dives into his new studies, new friendships, and new love, he learns that some people, like books, are easy to misread. And now he must consider: if one’s singular tragedy has already hit and everything after it has mattered quite a bit, what happens when more misfortune strikes?
Robyn Schneider’s The Beginning of Everything is a lyrical, witty, and heart-wrenching novel about how difficult it is to play the part that people expect, and how new beginnings can stem from abrupt and tragic endings.

I know this book does sound cliché at first, but it includes physically disabled characters, LGBT+ characters as well as characters consulting psychiatrist, so in the end, I found that it was a different and refreshing book!


A book on my TBR

In the Country We Love: My Family Divided by Diane Guererro

Genre: Non Fiction, Autobiography
Released in May 2016

Goodreads summary:
The star of Orange is the New Black and Jane the Virgin presents her personal story of the real plight of undocumented immigrants in this country.
In the Country We Love: My Family DividedDiane Guerrero, the television actress from the megahit Orange is the New Black and Jane the Virgin, was just fourteen years old on the day her parents and brother were arrested and deported while she was at school. Born in the U.S., Guerrero was able to remain in the country and continue her education, depending on the kindness of family friends who took her in and helped her build a life and a successful acting career for herself, without the support system of her family.
In the Country We Love is a moving, heartbreaking story of one woman’s extraordinary resilience in the face of the nightmarish struggles of undocumented residents in this country. There are over 11 million undocumented immigrants living in the US, many of whom have citizen children, whose lives here are just as precarious, and whose stories haven’t been told. Written with Michelle Burford, this memoir is a tale of personal triumph that also casts a much-needed light on the fears that haunt the daily existence of families likes the author’s and on a system that fails them over and over.


A book releasing soon

How to disappear by Sharon Huss Roat

Genre: YA, Contemporary
Release: August 2017
Why is it diverse? It deals with social anxiety which is hugely disregarded in my opinion.

Goodreads summary:
Vicky Decker has perfected the art of hiding in plain sight, quietly navigating the halls of her high school undetected except by her best (and only) friend, Jenna. But when Jenna moves away, Vicky’s isolation becomes unbearable.
How To DisappearSo she decides to invent a social life by Photoshopping herself into other people’s pictures, posting them on Instagram under the screen name Vicurious. Instantly, she begins to get followers, so she adds herself to more photos from all over the world with all types of people. And as Vicurious’s online followers multiply, Vicky realizes she can make a whole life for herself without ever leaving her bedroom. But the more followers she finds online, the clearer it becomes that there are a lot of people out there who feel like her— #alone and #ignored in real life.
To help them, and herself, Vicky must find the courage to face her fear of being “seen,” because only then can she stop living vicariously and truly bring the magic of Vicurious to life.
In this beautiful and illuminating narrative, Sharon Huss Roat shines a light on our love of social media and how sometimes being the person you think you want to be isn’t as great as being the person you truly are.


And that’s it for this week, I hope you enjoyed and please feel free to recommend more diverse reads in the comments! Have a nice day! Have you read any of those? Feel free to share your (nonspoilery) opinion below!