Daisy Jones & The Six: My Review

I’ve been hearing about this book everywhere ever since its release, so of course when it was released in France and we received a few copies of it at work I had to grab a copy for myself to see what all the fuss was about. I was a little bit afraid of the hype, but also curious as I hadn’t read any of Taylor Jenkins Reid’s books before. Well let me tell you, it is worth all the praise.

Title: Daisy Jones & The Six
Author: Taylor Jenkins Reid
Release: March 2019
Genre: Fiction
My rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

The story:

If you don’t know what Daisy Jones & The Six is about, it’s telling the story of the most popular rock band of the 70s and how it all came to an end after their best concert ever. Told through interviews of the different characters, it deals with rock music, people falling in an out of love, friendships, family, substance abuse and recovery.

Daisy Jones & The Six is an work of fiction, and it’s an absolute masterpiece.

Trigger warning: substance addiction, abortion

This review is spoiler free!

My opinion:

I started reading this book with low expectations because I was really worried that I would find it overhyped. But hell, I didn’t want to be the only person in the book community who hadn’t read Daisy Jones & The Six! But now I have read it, and I have completely fallen in love with it. This was my first Taylor Jenkins Reid book, and now all I can think of is how much I need to read The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo… But that’s a whole other topic.

Before I move further with my review, here’s a full disclaimer: this is 100% how I imagined Billy throughout the entire book. And yes that is partly because both characters are named Billy but I also felt that they had the same kind of aesthetic? So I really needed to mention that first.

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I was a bit suspiscious of the format at first, as it is told through interviews. But in the end, I thought it was super original, and worked really well with the story. It’s great to see the events from different perspectives, and as they speak one after another, it’s really easy to compare all of their points of view, and to realise that they all have a different opinion on what happened. On top of that, as it deals with rock stars, an interview really fits. And as the group ended up exploding for many different reasons, it was important that we as a reader could get all of the different details and aspects of the events.

I felt like it took a little long to get started, but once I was really immersed in the story I simply couldn’t put the book down. So obviously, if you didn’t gather that from my rating, I’m really glad that I picked up this book! I also heard that it would be turned into some kind of TV show and I’m really curious about that.

I really loved Daisy as a character. She is has many flaws, but she’s also really confident and unapologetic about who she is and I loved that about her. People going everywhere barefoot is also one of my favourite things so that was definitely a bonus 😇 Billy was not entirely who I expected him to be and I loved that about him. Karen was my badass queen of everything 👑 Graham was a relatable soft boy with a crush, and I thought he was really interesting (even though he made some questionable decisions in the end). Eddie Loving was always complaining but honestly when you see the rest of the characters you can really understand why. I thought he was really human — and rather relatable 💁🏻‍♀️ And Camila was simply amazing as well. This book had three fully fleshed amazing ladies, who were all different (with different lives, personalities and goals, etc.) and I absolutely loved that about it. Oh and I also loved Daisy’s friend Simone although we don’t see her as much!

From the beginning, we know how it’s going to turn out: they will rise to fame, and then break up. No one knows why. The journey to this was full of twists, and page after page, I was expecting to see the reason. But the intrigue was really well done and I had to wait til the end! Kudos to the author for keeping the suspense until the end! The intrigue was really well built, and the book was very well written in my opinion.

Sometimes books are hyped for a very good reason, and I’m pretty sure that is the case with Daisy Jones & The Six. I also heard that the audiobook was really good, and I’m sure it is as it would fit perfectly with the interview format! Anyway, if you have escaped reading it so far, what are you waiting for?

Bonus: This book is full of great and amazing quotes, here’s one of my favourites!

“You can justify anything. If you’re narcissistic enough to believe that the universe conspires for and against you—which we all are, deep down—then you can convince yourself you’re getting signs about anything and everything.”

Have you read Daisy Jones & The Six? Is it on your TBR? Let me know!

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Shadow Frost: My Review

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First of all, many thanks to the publisher Blackstone Publishing for providing me with a review copy of this book! This doesn’t influence my opinion in any way.

Title: Shadow Frost
Author: Coco Ma
Genre: YA Fantasy
Release date: October 1st, 2019
My rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

I did not really see this coming but Shadow Frost totally reminded me of the previous ARC I reviewed, which was Quests and Quandaries by Alda Yuan (see full review). I don’t know, it must be the whole fantasy quest thing that made me think of it. Or the whole heroine who is a heiress to the throne thing. Anyway. While I was a bit underwhelmed by my reading of Quests and Quandaries, I really enjoyed Shadow Frost and I can’t wait for October so that you all can discover it was well!

And before I delve further into the book, let’s just all take a minute to appreciate how GORGEOUS that cover is. It’s absolutely stunning, I’m in love.

This review is spoiler free!

The story:

When she learns that he kingdom is in great peril because of a monster of darkness that has been unleashed upon it, princess Asterin Faelenhart decides that she must leave the palace in order to defeat it. With the help of her friends, and two mysterious strangers who have only recently joined forces with her, she goes after it.

But as they search for the demon, she not only discovers that she may have greater powers than she ever expected, but also that the demon is part of a bigger force menacing the kingdom of Axaria. And Asterin will do anything to save her kingdom and the people she loves.

My thoughts:

Shadow Frost is Coco Ma’s first novel, and I have to say, she did a really good job. She created a whole fantastic universe, with magical powers, demons and other fantastic creatures. Think something like Red Queen except it does not depend on your blood. And there are dragons. Everyone can wield at least one element (like air or water). Some of the elements are rarer than others: the rarest for example is the power of illusion. There are nine elements in total; the tenth one, the shadow elements, is forbidden. And some people can use two, three or more powers at the same time. Obviously, the strongest are those who can use all nine.

Not only did Shadow Frost have great world building, but it also had a great team of characters, all strong in their own ways and I really enjoyed that. We also got to read through all of their perspectives which I always appreciate. My only regret when it came to the characters was that I found the chemistry lacking between Asterin and Quinlan. That being said, I love them all equally.

On a completely different note, I really liked the fact that there were several plot twists in revealing who the true villain of the story was. The resolution managed to make total sense while also not being too predictable.

I also felt that the characters were deeply human, and had to make really hard decisions on several occasions which made the book all the more realistic (you know, if you don’t count the wyverns, poisoned wells and other magical creatures). That’s yet another aspect of the story I really appreciated!

The ending was rather open and I wasn’t entirely satisfied with it because I still have MANY questions but I’m guessing there will be a sequel? I hope so!

The Bermudez Triangle: My Review

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To be honest, I had been meaning to pick up another book by Maureen Johnson ever since I read Let It Snow, and that was in 2015, so as usual things didn’t go as planned. But as her novel The Bermudez Triangle was translated into French — a mere 15 years after its original publication — we received some copies at work and I decided that it was finally time.

Alternative title: On The Count Of Three
Author: Maureen Johnson
Genre: YA Contemporary
First publication: 2004
My rating: ⭐⭐⭐

The story:

Nina, Avery and Mel have been friends forever. They do everything together. But the summer before their senior year of high school Nina goes away to a summer camp at Stanford university. Not only does she come back more ready than ever to go to college, but she also has fallen in love.

Meanwhile, her two best friends have stayed home all summer to work in an Irish Pub, and when she asks them about their own potential summer romances, she cannot get a word out of them. Until she sees them actually making out. And soon they realise that the balance of their friendship —  the balance of the Bermudez triangle! has been broken.

My thoughts:

This review may contain mild spoilers!

Honestly when I realised that this book was a WLW summer romance featuring one of my favourite tropes of all time aka best friends falling in love, I was all in. But the premise of this book was too good to be true. It was sweet in the beginning, but although the lesbian rep was great the bisexual rep was kind of terrible so I was a bit disappointed. Overall, it was a bit underwhelming

Mel was my favourite character by far. She is honest about how she feels from beginning to end. She looks soft, but is actually really fierce, and I really loved that about her. She is a teenager discovering herself, she is coming of age, and discovering her own sexuality, and I thought her portrayal was really good.

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// legit representation of how I feel about Mel, she’s just amazing //

Avery on the other end was rather frustrating. Or confusing. Or maybe both. As long as she is alone with Mel, things seem to work out just fine, but when the rest of the world comes into perspective, I completely lost her. Like, we get it, she is not out of the closet, and that’s totally fine. It’s also totally okay to feel like labels do not represent you. But to loathe clichés and then fall right back into them? I felt like her characterization was a bit off, and it was really hard to follow her train of thoughts. As she appears to be bi or pan, or something close to that, I thought she could be the character I would relate to the most, but I was sadly disappointed.

Now, Nina. Nina is smart and rich, she seems to have everything. She is the president of the student council. Over summer, she started dating THE PERFECT GUY. And he really seems perfect, except for the fact that he lives on the other side of the country. To be honest, I didn’t really like her romance with Steve, especially when it became a long distance thing. They clearly didn’t have that much in common, and something kind of felt off between them? I don’t know. I had a hard time understanding Nina as a character, and I also felt like she was not a very good friend, neither to Mel or Avery.

As for the rest of the characters, I really liked Parker. He was a good friend to Mel, and proved to be really honest about his feelings on several occasions. The novel is told from the different POV of the three girls, and it was nice to get to know him from all of their perspectives. Parker was definitely a ray of sunshine among what fell flat in this novel.

Overall, I was expecting to get to see more of female friendships, because they’re the most precious thing in the world. And I was expecting a great romance between Mel and Avery because come on, it’s a YA novel! I know that relationships don’t always work out in the long run, but I was really rooting for them, only to be disappointed. I mean, yes, it was realistic, but a girl can dream. Steve and Nina could have been a good example of how a good relationship can still be considered a good relationship even if it has reached its end! Or maybe Avery and Mel could have kept dating through the year and then parted ways without all the UNNECESSARY DRAMA. But I’m rambling. What I mean to say, I guess, is that this book was not entirely what I expected, and I was a bit disappointed.

Oh and also, the whole coming out plotline thing could have been dealt with in a much better way, both when it came to the girls’ school and when it came to their families.

That being said, it’s been a while since a read a YA novel that was set in the 2000s aka the good old days when we did not have cell phones, and wrote emails to our friends, and that was a lot of fun! I also feel like YA as well as LGBTQIAP+ both have evolved a lot since then, so maybe that’s why this book felt a bit off. That being said, I’m going to add one more time: MEL IS AMAZING AND I LOVE HER.

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In the end, I had a hard time making up my mind about this book, so I read some reviews on goodreads and I basically saw people said they either LOVED the book, or really disliked it: one of the main reasons for that being the terrible bisexual rep. So I have to say: I loved the premise, but yes, the execution was not that great.

That being said, if you have read The Bermudez Triangle, please share your opinion in the comments, I would love to discuss!

Top 5 Wednesday: Books Without Romance

Top Five Wednesday is a weekly meme created by Lainey @GingerReadsLainey and she has passed down the torch to Sam @ThoughtsOnTomes. For more information and for future topics you can check out the goodreads group.

As their are no official topics for this summer, I rummaged through some folders on the goodreads group, and dug up one for this week. I’m not sure how long I’m going to last with this method, but today, I’m going to talk about five books amazing books without romance, and trust me it was not easy to find them!


As usual, the list is in no particular order:

#1. Vicious by V. E. Schwab

As I just did a review of her book City of Ghosts, which would also have matched the prompt, I decided to pick up another one of her fantastic novels. Vicious evolves around two best friends, Victor and Eli, who acquired superpowers, and also became enemies. It’s a story about survival and what being a hero actually means. It’s a really good book, which doesn’t contain any romance. It’s about people meeting, and surviving together. And I really have to get my hands on the sequel, Vengeful, because it looks just as amazing — and I’m out of Victoria Schwab books so here we go!

#2. Wonder by R.J. Palacio

This one is completely different from Vicious, but equally brilliant. Wonder is about a August, a little boy who was born with a facial deformation. As the book starts, he is about to start going to school with other kids (his mom had homeschooled him so far). It’s about him facing bullying, but also being accepted by other kids, making friends, and growing up. It is told through various points of view, and we also for example get to see his mother coming to terms with the fact that he is growing up. It’s a very beautiful book, and if you haven’t read it yet, I most definitely recommend it!

#3. Beautiful Broken Things by Sara Barnard

I’m not saying I don’t talk about Sara Barnard’s books enough on my blog because I actually mention them quite often, but one more time won’t hurt! In Beautiful Broken Things we talk about friendship, about growing up, and about coming to terms with your own mental illness. It’s a very beautiful book which made me both cry and smile. The sequel, Fierce Fragile Hearts is out, and I will hopefully be picking it up over the summer!

#4. Aru Shah and the End of Time by Roshani Chokshi

I told you I would talk about this book a lot and I was not lying! Aru Shah is officially one of my favourite books, and by the time I reached this part of my blog post I realised that middle grade fiction was apparently a good example for books that didn’t have romance. It is only fitting for me to talk about this one again. It’s a story about friendship and family, but it’s also an adventure in order to save the world: what more could one ask for?

#5. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis

Narnia is another one of my favourite series of all times. I think I’ve read them at least four times, and I DEFINITELY DON’T TALK ABOUT THEM ENOUGH on here, so of course this post was the perfect occasion for me to promote it. As your typical middle grade fantasy, The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe aka book 2 in the Narnia series (and also the most known one) is about friendship, family and saving the world. It also has some nice historical touches as it takes place around WWII, and I cherish the characters with al my heart ♥


And that’s it for this post! I hope you enjoyed this list; feel free to recommend me more books without romance in the comments, as I would love to increase my never ending TBR list!

City of Ghosts: My Review

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Well it seems like I was in the mood for some middle grade fantasy this month because although I always want to pick up more of them, I never seem to actually do so, and here I am with not only one but two reviews for middle grade fiction! (This post being one, and that one being the other).

I originally wanted to read City of Ghosts around Halloween last year, back when it was released, but as usual, things did not go the way I wanted them to when it came to my TBR. Anyway, last weekend I suddenly decided to pick it up and I read it in one day. You know, after I made that TBR post, and then I read something else entirely, just like I always do. But anyway I had been meaning to read this one for quite some time, and I’m glad I actually did because I really loved it!

Title: City of Ghosts (Cassidy Blake #1)
Author: Victoria Schwab
Genre: Fantasy, Middle Grade Fiction
Release: 2018
My rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

The story:

Cassidy’s parents are famous for the books they wrote about history and ghosts. And now they’re going to make a TV show about it, and they’re leaving for Edinburgh, the so called “city of ghosts”. Cassidy can say goodbye to a summer by the sea because she’s going ghosts hunting with her parents, and she’s not to keen on the idea.

But here’s the thing: her parents can’t see ghosts although she actually can. Her best friend is one of them. And it seems like she still has a lot to learn when it comes to the world of the dead…

My thoughts:

As expected of a Victoria Schwab book, I couldn’t put it down. Once again, she created a whole universe of her own, and an amazing one. After being transported through all different Londons in her Shades of Magic trilogy, I was delighted to be brought back to in Edinburgh in City of Ghosts. I really love this city, and it was nice to see all those little reference to places where I had actually been to. Well, not all of them, but since I’ve been there, I could recognize some of the places mentioned, and I really loved that. Victoria Schwab really did her research when it comes to the history of the city, it shows and I’m here for it!

I thought the premise of the story was really smart and funny: while Cassidy can see ghosts (her best friend is one!), it’s not entirely sure that her parents DO believe in them although they keep talking about them whether in their books, or now on their TV show. They mostly accept that Cassidy’s best friend is a ghost, and pretend that it’s normal, although we can clearly see that her dad doesn’t really take it seriously. And while very realistic it also brought some great comic relief which I really loved.

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All in all, I loved the characters. Jacob is fascinating and I really hope we get to know more about him in the next book. Lara is a badass and I absolutely adore her. Cassidy’s parents are super original, but also really care about their daughter which I really loved about them. And of course Cass herself. She lives in her own little world, with a best friend invisible to all but her. She has always known that she was a little bit different, but only through City of Ghosts will she discover just how different she is — and how amazing that makes her.

So yes, this book is amazing, and really got me thinking that I should read more middle grade fantasy! And in the meantime, I’ll be waiting for September 3rd aka the release of Tunnel of Bones (a title just as charming!) which I heard is taking place in Paris, and is getting me REAL EXCITED! I’m guessing it will take place at least partly in the catacombs and oh boy I can’t wait!

Aru Shah and the End of Time: My Review

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To be really honest with you, this book has been on my radar ever since I heard of its existence and I have absolutely no clue as to why I did not pick it up sooner. I love mythology, and I’m also a huge fan of Percy Jackson, so when I heard that a similar concept would be applied to Indian mythology (to put it shortly) I knew that I had to read it.

Back in January, I also read Roshani Chokshi’s book The Gilded Wolves and I absolutely fell in love with her writing, which reminded me that I also really wanted to read Aru Shah. And finally, a few weeks ago we received some copies of the French translation at work, and I finally knew that my opportunity was here.

Title: Aru Shah and the End of Time (Pandava Quartet #1)
Author: Roshani Chokshi
Genre: Fantasy, Middle Grade Fiction
Release: 2018
My rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

The story:

Aru knew she should not have touched the lamp, but when three of her classmates call her a liar and dare her to do so, she cannot resist. And now her mother is petrified, and the rest of the world is going to end… She has ten days to stop it with the help of one of her newly found sisters, and a talking pigeon.

My thoughts:

I absolutely loved this book. I started it hoping that I would, and slightly afraid that I’d be disappointed but I was not, not one second. I absolutely loved that universe, as well as its characters. It was really fun to read about Indian mythology, and its heroes and deities. I learnt a lot, and it made me want to know more!

Reading middle grade books is somehow very comforting, especially when you know it’s the first book in a series. You know there’s going to be some crazy adventures and twists, and at the same time, you have your eyes full of stars and excitement because you are discovering a new universe, and in the end you also know that nothing too bad can happen because it’s only the first volume in the series. Aru Shah and the End of Time was all of this for me. It also had a catastrophic cliffhanger at the end which I absolutely loved, and I’m very grateful that I finally received my copy of the sequel so I can know what happens next.

While reading Aru Shah it felt a little bit like I was coming home, in fantasyland where I belong, and I love that feeling.

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I loved both Aru and Mini. They complete each other in many ways, and have a great dynamic. While Aru knew nothing about her origins, Mini has been raised knowing all about how real the Pandava are… Except that her entire family thought her brother would be the chosen one. Both of their upbringing make for very strong and interesting characters which I LOVED. I also really loved their companion Boo, and can’t wait to find out more about him, as well as the other sisters we will most likely meet in the other books.

One more thing I loved was the flashbacks and the backstory surrounding Aru’s mother: yet another thing I can’t wait to find out more about!

Overall, Aru Shah is a great first book in a fantasy middle grade series! It is well written and dynamic. It is original, and has both some smart and fun moments. It’s a very endearing book, which managed to warm my cold heart and grab a spot on the list of books that will always be dear to me. I’m trying to promote it at the bookstore but it’s not really working so far… I’m not giving up though!

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So to conclude, GO 👏 READ 👏 THIS 👏 BOOK and also brace yourselves because I can’t shut up about it, so you’re probably going to see it on the blog a lot!

Top 5 Wednesday: Father Figures

Top Five Wednesday is a weekly meme created by Lainey @GingerReadsLainey and she has passed down the torch to Sam @ThoughtsOnTomes. For more information and for future topics you can check out the goodreads group.

Once again, there are no official topics for this summer, so I am trying to dig up some old topics. For this week, I thought Favourite Father Figures would be appropriate, considering on the one hand that I did their mother figures counterparts last month, and that Sunday is Father’s Day! So without further ado, here are some of my favourite father figures!


In no particular order:

1. Cath’s dad in Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell

I love Cath’s dad. He is always doing his best for his daughters, and supporting them no matter what, and although this is how every parent shoud be, this is not how every parents are, both irl and in books. So kudos to Cath’s dad for simply being the best, despite the fact that he had to raise both of his daughters alone!

2. Starr’s father in The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

I was brainstorming ideas to add to this list when Starr’s dad came to my mind, and I knew that he would be a perfect fit. He is a very strong character, who only wants what’s best for his kids. He knows that even though the path won’t be easy, this is what should be the best for them in the future. And in the midst of all the events, he always knows how to care for his daughter, and stand by her side. He is truly an inspiration.

3. Sirius Black in the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling

And yes I know this is highly unoriginal but I think that Sirius is an extremely important father figure to Harry. He knew both of his parents, was best friends with his dad, and is his godfather after all. He is the family Harry never had with the Dursleys, and who accepts him for who he is. And more over, even after spending 12 years in Azkaban, he was willing to give him all his attention, time, love, and everything he needed. All hail fanfics and rpers who allow Sirius to live forever!

4. Linh Garan in The Lunar Chronicles by Marissa Meyer

Yes, I know, we don’t see much of him. But he was a good man. He was a good father to Peony and Pearl. And he fully accepted Cinder with all of her baggage — and she had a lot of that! So yes, I think he deserves a place on that list. Also I couldn’t think of anybody else…

5. Henry Flynn in the Monsters of Verity duology by Victoria Schwab

He too was a good man. Despite all the responsibilities he had, he tried to stay true to his nature and be good with the people he was responsible for. For a long time, he was like a father to August and the other Sunai. And I think that’s beautiful. There were a lot of horrible people & horrible deeds in this duology (which I really loved btw) and amidst all of that Henry Flynn was a very interesting figure, because while he was one with power, he was also a good man.


And that’s it for this list, feel free to share some of your favourite father figures in the comments ♥